This article will show you how to create a numerical question. Numerical questions allow for a numerical answer within a specified range.


For calculated questions please refer to Creating a Simple Calculated Question. For more in depth instructions on numerical questions, see .



Click any image below to enlarge

Step 1 - Open the question bank

Create a question by selecting  the drop down for ‘question bank’ and then select ‘questions’

Step 2 - Create a new question

On the next page select the ‘create a new question’ button

Step 3 - Choose numerical question

Select 'numerical' from the list then click 'Add'

Step 4 - Select a category

Select which category you want the question to be added to in the question bank

Step 5 - Name the question

Enter a question name, this will not be shown to students but should help identify the question for you

Step 6 - Enter the question text

See Using the Equations Editor to Insert Mathematical Equations for more information.


Step 7 - Select the default mark

This sets the maximum mark for this question.


Step 8 - Score the question

Enter the correct answer and select a percentage it will be worth (if multiple answers are entered this must add up to 100%)


Note you can add a value into the 'error' box, which shows the range of accepted answer. For this I have entered 0.1, so 15.6 and 15.5 will also be accepted. Likewise if you put 1, all values between 14.5 and 16.5 would be accepted

Step 9 - Add feedback

You can add feedback  as well to help students understand where they went wrong or why they were correct.


Step 10 - Save

Click save changes to add the question to category

Step 11 - Review

You will then be displayed with your question and other questions in that category. You can click the magnifying glass icon Preview to preview the question or the cog Edit to further edit it


For information on adding questions to your quiz see the 'Adding Questions To Your Quiz' section of Creating Questions / Building Your Quiz.

There are also options for allowing students to choose a 'unit' to answer with, please see here for more information.


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